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Josh Reviews The Imagineering Story

I loved every minute of this six-part Disney+ documentary series, exploring the history of Disney’s theme-parks and their rides.  The series was directed by Leslie Iwerks, who is the daughter of Disney Imagineer Don Iwerks and the granddaughter of Ub Iwerks, who co-created Mickey Mouse.  So she knows a bit about Disney!  Yes, of course this is a pro-Disney piece of propaganda.  But it is magnificent, well-earned propaganda!  The series digs deeply into the ins and outs of the different Disney parks and all of the best attractions, from the Pirates of the Caribbean to Star Tours to the Enchanted Tiki Room to Space Mountain to the Tower of Terror to Soarin’ to so many more.  Through this mini-series, we get to meet many of the talented men and women who helped create these attractions, and we learn many of the secrets of the parks and their history.

Episode one detains the almost-insane, unbelievable effort and expense of building the first Disney theme park, Disneyland in California.  What an extraordinary vision Walt Disney had!  It’s really quite amazing.  We get to see incredible footage of the park’s 1955 opening, and then we see additions and enhancements to the parks made in the following years, which established the concept that the Disney parks would always be changing and updating.  We see the 1959 Tomorrowland redesign, the construction of the Matterhorn (the park’s first thrill ride), the redesign of the jungle cruise that added humor to the ride, and the addition of the monorail.  I loved getting to see insights into the building of iconic Disney rides the Carousel of Progress, It’s a Small World, and Pirates of the Caribbean.  The episode ends with Walt Disney’s death at the age of 65 in 1966.  It’s heartbreaking to see how sad so many of Walt’s co-workers are — even in the interviews done in recent years — regarding his death.

Episode two explores the making of the Haunted Mansion, giving some very cool glimpses into how the ghost illusions are made.  We get to see the opening of Walt Disney World in Florida in 1971, the first (but far from the last) expansion of the Disney theme park empire.  I loved the tour we got of the secret underground city beneath Walt Disney World, used by cast-members and employees.  I really dug the exploration of EPCOT (still my favorite of the Disney parks!), and how Walt Disney’s idea for an actual sustainable modern city morphed into an educational theme park.  I was delighted to learn that Ray Bradbury wrote the original script for Spaceship Earth.  And it was cool to see the development of the circle-rama technology used in some of the EPCOT … [continued]

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Josh Reviews the Season Finale of Star Trek: Picard

Star Trek: Picard has been a very mixed bag for me.  I’ve enjoyed watching it, and I think it’s been far better executed than the two seasons of Discovery we’ve gotten so far on CBS All Access.  On the other hand, in my opinion Picard contains many of the same flaws that Discovery has had: plots that doing make sense; storytelling that moves too fast to adequately explain what is happening; thinly-developed characters, many of whom have motivations that either are kept secret from us or that don’t make sense; and a lack of continuity with previously established Star Trek.  The Picard season finale, “Et in Arcadia Ego” part 2, is very much of a piece with the first nine episodes of this season.  There are some wonderful individual moments; the cast is great; Sir Patrick Stewart in particular shines as always; and the visuals are beautiful.  I just wish it all came together in a more satisfying way.

Let’s start with what works.

The show, as always, is beautiful.  The production values on this series have been extraordinary, and it’s awesome to see television Star Trek realized with feature film caliber attention and budget.  There are lots of great locations in this episode: the crashed Borg Cube, the crashed La Sirena, the androids’ utopian complex, and the bridges of several starships.  Seeing the Orchids take on the Romulan fleet in orbit is particularly spectacular.

There are some delightful character moments: Riker’s triumphant return, back in uniform and back in the Captain’s chair on a starship.  (I wish it was the Enterprise.  The series never revealed what happened to the Enterprise...!  I’d love to see her in season two…!)  Picard bidding Riker adieu.  Rios’ and Seven’s sharing a drink, looking out at a gorgeous vista.

And, of course, the scene between Picard and Data.  I’m thrilled that Brent Spiner was back as Data in the finale, beautifully bookending his appearance in the premiere.  (Mr. Spiner also appeared in these last two episodes as Dr. Alton Soong, however that character wasn’t very successful in my opinion.  I just don’t buy that Dr. Soong had a song about the same age as Data who we never heard of before and who never had any interaction with Data while he was alive.)  The survival of Data’s consciousness doesn’t make any plot sense to me, but the scene is so emotionally moving that I can mostly forgive the show for this.  (Though, seriously, as I’d commented at the start of the season, the idea that Data’s consciousness could be reconstructed from one fragment of his positronic net is the sort of magic fake-science I hate to see on Trek.  Also, if Alton … [continued]

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Josh reviews Episodes 7-9 of Star Trek: Picard!

We’re almost at the end of the first season of Star Trek: Picard.  I enjoyed the premiere, but then I felt episodes 2 and 3 were very mediocre.  The show has been better since then (click here for my reviews of episodes 4-6), and I am enjoying watching it.  At the same time, I continue to be disappointed by some baffling story choices that just don’t sit too well with me.  Let’s dig in.  (Beware some spoilers below.)

Episode 7: “Nepenthe”

* There’s a lot to enjoy in this episode.  Seeing Riker and Troi again is an absolute delight.  Both Jonathan Frakes and Marina Sirtis are great, so comfortably reprising their beloved characters.  There were so many wonderful moments between them in the episode.  I loved hearing Riker yell “shields up!” just like old times when he realizes Picard might be in danger.  I love how Troi immediately senses Picard isn’t OK.  I love how quickly Riker puts everything together about Soji.  (I loved that the actress who played Soji mimicked the way Brent Spiner would tilt his head as Data — I recognized that immediately, and I was pleased that Riker did as well.)  I loved hearing Riker call Troi Imzadi.  I also quite enjoyed Lulu Wilson as Riker & Troi’s daughter, Kestra.  (I love the deep cut that their daughter is named Kestra, the name of Deanna’s dead sister as revealed in the TNG episode “Dark Page”.)  This precocious kid could have easily been very annoying, but I quite liked her and I enjoyed the way she and Soji developed a quick and easy bond.  (It’s reminiscent of the way Data connected so easily to children.)  I loved hearing Kestra question Soji about whether she could play the violin, if she liked Sherlock Holmes, etc. (all things Data loved).

* On the other hand, I’m speechless at the incredibly dumb plot point that Riker and Troi’s son Thaddeus died because, after the Federation’s ban on synthetic life forms, they couldn’t get what used to be an easily-acquired cure from something cultivated in a positronic matrix.  Whaaaa…???  How/why could a medicine be cultivated in an android’s brain?  Do the writers even know what a positronic matrix is??  This is ludicrous, a dumb way of trying to connect Riker-Troi to the series’ over-arching story about synthetics.  (If they HAD to make this sort of larger thematic connection, why not say the medicine that could have cured Thaddeus was from Romulus, and so unavailable after the Federation abandoned the Romulans when their sun went super-nova?  That would have made a lot more sense, right?)  (By the way, I’ve been saying all along that Picard’s leaving Starfleet in … [continued]

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Josh Reviews For All Mankind Season One!

I signed up for Apple TV, just so I could watch this new show from Ronald D. Moore.  And I have no regrets!  Mr. Mooore was one of the best writers on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and he was the creator and show-runner of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica, a show I absolutely adore.  For All Mankind, created by Ronald D. Moore, Matt Wolpert and Ben Nedivi, tells an alternate history of what might have transpired had the Russians won the space race and beat the U.S. to landing a man on the moon in 1969.  That sounds like it could be a dark version of history, but the show is remarkably positive and aspirational, taking the approach that the continued competition between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. led to the U.S.’s not abandoning the Apollo program after Apollo 17 in 1972.  This was one of my very favorite TV shows of 2019!

The show depicts this alternate history in a fascinatingly considered, documentary-like approach.  The series isn’t a fake-doc, but it has the gravitas of a period piece chronicle of an important time in history; it just so happens that this history is fake!  It feels like an alt-history version of From the Earth to the Moon.  I thought it was fantastic, a wonderful piece of speculative fiction that was fascinating and thrilling.

I was delighted by the many little details and moments that show us how the show’s alternate history diverged from our reality.  It’s fascinating to hear, on the radio, that Ted Kennedy cancelled his party at Chappaquiddick in order to attend NASA hearings following the Soviet’s moon landings… and then, later in the show, we learn that, untarnished by that tragedy, he’s elected President!  (It’s also fascinating to hear reports, later in the season, that President Ted Kennedy winds up embroiled in a sex scandal involving Mary Jo Kopechne — who, in reality, died at Chappaquiddick in 1969.)

As I noted above, I was very surprised and taken by the idea that, far from this show’s being some sort of dystopia, we see that many remarkably positive events spiral out of the U.S.’s loss of the space race to the Russians.  We see that NASA succeeded in creating a lunar habitat; that public pressure led to the inclusion of female astronauts far earlier than actually happened, and how that change then led to the passage of the E.R.A. in the seventies (while the E.R.A. was never, in reality, ratified).  These are just a few of many examples!  I love how, on the show, the discovery of ice on the moon in 1971 (far earlier than happened in … [continued]

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TV Viewing Recommendations for Your Coronavirus Isolation!

March 18th, 2020

Hi everyone!  Earlier this week I posted a number of movie recommendations that I hope are helpful for people looking for entertainment suggestions for their coronavirus isolation.

Today, let’s look at some TV show ideas…!

The Good Place – This is the show I have been most evangelical about recently.  I adore The Good Place.  It’s so funny and also so clever, with lots of deep stuff to say about ethics and morality.  The show’s cast likes to describe it as the smartest dumb show on TV, and I agree.  I HIGHLY recommend this show!!!!  Click here for my review of season one — but don’t read it until after you’ve seen the season, because you don’t want to be spoiled!  Where to watch: Netflix.

Fleabag This very clever (and – beware! – very raunchy!) comedy won a ton of Emmys this year, and they were well-deserved.  Phoebe Waller Bridge created and stars in this show about a messed-up young woman whose best friend and confidant is you, the person watching her show.  It’s only two short seasons of six half-hour episodes each; you’ll blaze through them and wish there was more!  Click here for my review.  Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video.

Catastrophe This amazing, hilarious show was written by Sharon Horgan and Rob Delaney, who also star as Sharon and Rob.  Rob is American and Sharon is British — their brief fling turns into a relationship when Sharon gets pregnant, and these two hot messes decide to try to make a go of it together.  This show is insanely funny and also staggeringly, shockingly profane.  It’s not for the easily-offended but wow do I love it a lot.  Click here for my review of season one.  Where to watch: Amazon Prime Video.

Atlanta – Donald Glover’s amazing show about a group of young African Americans is super funny and heartbreaking and weird and unique.  I was so intrigued by every single episode.  This is masterful filmmaking.  Click here for my review of season one.  Where to watch: Hulu, or available for rent/purchase on Amazon Prime Video.

Black Mirror – I love this very dark anthology show about the dangers of technology.  Each episode is its own stand-alone story.  I suggest starting with “The Entire History of You” from season one.  I think it’s the show’s best episode.  If you like that episode, then dig into the rest.  Click here for my review of the original six British episodes.  Where to watch: Netflix.

Brockmire – Hank Azaria plays the greatest role of his career as disgraced former baseball announcer Jim Brockmire.  The show is incredibly raunchy and fall … [continued]

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Viewing Recommendations For Your Coronavirus Isolation!

March 16th, 2020

I hope everyone reading this is healthy and doing OK managing the social and economic fallout of the Coronavirus pandemic.  I am not a doctor (cue the Dan Goor production company “Not a doctor!” soundbite seen at the end of every Brooklyn Nine-Nine episode), so I thought, how can help in my own small way?  The answer: by being your one-stop source for viewing and entertainment recommendations!

Let’s dig in with some ideas for great movies to watch that you might not have seen.

Note #1: None of these movies are virus or pandemic-themed.

Note #2: I’m not going to list super-famous movies like Raiders of the Lost Ark here; I’ve tried to dig a little deeper with my recommendations…

 

Comedies:

In a World… For the past several years, this little movie has been one of my go-to recommendations.  Written, directed, and starring Lake Bell, she plays a young woman trying to get into the movie trailer voice-over business.  The film is sweet and funny and a very interesting look into this aspect of movie-making: the voice-overs for movie trailers.  (Click here for my full review.)

Late Night This comedy/drama came out this past summer; Mindy Kaling wrote it and stars as a young woman who gets hired as the only non-white-male on the writing staff of a late-night talk show (whose host is played by Emma Thompson).  (Click here for my full review.)

The Way Way Back A beautiful, sweet, funny coming-of-age story.  A teenager finds solace from his home life in a part-time summer job at a local, small-time water park, and a friend and almost-father-figure in the park’s amiable manager (played by Sam Rockwell, who is terrific).  I have a sweet spot for the specific sub-culture of summer jobs and how impactful that can be for young people.  (Click here for my full review.)

Adventureland Another terrific coming-of-age movie set in the context of a summer job; this one is about a post-college young man who discovers that his degree in literature doesn’t really qualify him for any sort of employment back home in Pittsburgh, so he winds up working at Adventureland, a somewhat tired old local amusement park.  The cast is amazing: Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Martin Starr, Bill Hader, Kristen Wiig, Ryan Reynolds, and more.  (Click here for my full review.)

The Big Sick Comedian Kumail Nanjiani co-wrote this film with his wife, Emily V. Gordon; and he also stars in this very funny, and also dramatic, film that tells the real story of how Emily fell into a coma soon after the two started dating.  (Click here for my [continued]

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“Destiny is on the phone!” Josh Reviews The Tick: Season Two

I have loved Ben Edlund’s superhero parody, The Tick, in all of its iterations.  I read the original black-and-white comic book in the late eighties and early nineties.  I enjoyed Fox’s animated Saturday morning cartoon version, that ran from 1994-1996.  And I loved Fox’s short-lived live-action version from 2001, which starred Seinfeld’s Patrick Warburton as the Tick.  But I think my favorite of these three TV versions of The Tick is easily Amazon’s wonderful new live-action version.  And so, of course, the show was cancelled by Amazon last year, soon after the second season was released.  Dammit!

I loved the second season of the show, and it made my list of my favorite TV shows of 2019.  If you haven’t yet seen the show, it’s still available on Amazon Prime Video, so I encourage you to start from the beginning and check it out.  (Click here for my review of the pilot, and here for my review of season one.)

The show is a very funny parody of super-hero tropes.  At the same time, this isn’t just a spoof — this version of The Tick works as a comedy but also as a fun super-hero action-adventure.  There are real stakes, both physical and emotional, for all of the characters.  I love the balance the show is able to strike between these two sides of its story.

I’ve really grown to love the ensemble cast of this show.  Peter Serafinowicz (Guardians of the Galaxy, Spy), is absolutely perfect as the Tick himself.  Mr. Serafinowicz has the physicality for the character, and he perfectly nails the Tick’s “hey, chum!” enthusiasm and innocence.  Griffin Newman is a fantastic partner for Mr. Serafinowicz as Arthur, the not-so-superpowered friend/partner/sidekick of the Tick.  I love the humanity that Mr. Newman brought to Arthur.  Arthur is a nerd, but he’s noble and brave and heroic in his own way, and Mr. Newman’s performance really allows those elements of the character to shine.  Valorie Curry was terrific as Arthur’s sister Dot.  She was my favorite character on the show!  I loved how central the show allowed Dot to be.  The writers served up a great twist this season, when Dot begins to develop a precognition super-power, and I loved her bizarre relationship with Overkill.  Speaking of which, Scott Speiser was so great as the grim, dour Overkill — a parody of grim, dour super-hero vigilantes — who the show gradually developed into a very endearing character.  Yara Martinez continued to be so funny as Miss Lint.  I loved seeing Lint experiment this season with being a hero, under the new identity of Joan of Arc.  It was fun to … [continued]

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Josh Reviews The Gentlemen

The Gentlemen, written and directed by Guy Ritchie, tells a complicated yarn of the interactions among many different players in the London crime scene, from low-level street toughs to the wealthy masterminds overseeing their empires.  Guy Ritchie came onto the scene with two fantastic crime films of this type: Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch.  I love both of those films!  While I have enjoyed some of Mr. Ritchie’s big-budget Hollywood work (I really liked the first Sherlock Holmes film he made with Robert Downey, Jr.), I’ve been longing for Mr. Ritchie to return to this type of funny and scary fast-paced crime story that he does so well.  (2008’s RocknRolla was an attempt, but I thought that film was something of a miss.)

While I wouldn’t say that The Gentlemen equals Lock, Stock or Snatch, it’s a very enjoyable romp of a film!  Mr. Ritchie’s fast-paced style is back in full force, and the film is stuffed to overflowing with colorful characters and outrageous circumstances.  The story is somewhat confusing, but it works because of the playful joy with which the entire thing unfolds.  The film is full of fast-paced dialogue and whip-fast jokes.  The narrative is a pleasingly bizarre jumble, complicated by unreliable narrators (especially Hugh Grant’s reporter Fletcher, who tells the story of much of the film’s events) and Mr. Ritchie’s usual creative approach to storytelling.

The film’s cast of weird and dangerous characters is played by a fantastically talented ensemble.  Hugh Grant puts on a thick London accent to play Fletcher, the newspaper investigator who believes he’s discovered his ticket to fortune.  Matthew McConaughey plays Mickey Pearson, the suave and dangerous crime lord.  Charlie Hunnam plays Raymond Smith, Mickey’s right-hand-man and fixer.  Colin Farrell plays Coach, who mentors a group of young wannabe-criminals.  Henry Golding plays Dry Eye, a Chinese gangster looking to make a move on Mickey.  Michelle Dockery (Downton Abbey) plays Rosalind, Mickey’s wife and a formidable player in her own right.  Jeremy Strong (Zero Dark Thirty, Lincoln, Molly’s Game) plays Matthew, the wealthy businessman looking to purchase Mickey’s empire.  Eddie Marsan (Sherlock Holmes, The World’s End, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell) plays Big Dave, editor of a British tabloid with a grudge against Mickey.  And that’s just scratching the surface…!

There’s a lot of bad language and some juvenile humor in the film.  This isn’t a movie for everyone.  It’s been mostly savaged by the critics, but I’m not sure what they were looking for in this film.  This isn’t Citizen Kane.  Not every film need to be!  It’s a pleasingly diverting lark, one that I found to be funny and … [continued]

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Star Trek: Child of Two Worlds

Recently, I have been enjoying catching up on the many great Star Trek: The Original Series novels that author Greg Cox has written over the past several years!  I’ve arrived at last at the last one that had been waiting patiently on my book-shelf: Child of Two Worlds.

This story is set shortly after the events of “The Cage” (the original, unaired Star Trek pilot, that was later repurposed as the flashback sequences in “The Menagerie”).  Captain Christopher Pike is in command of the Enterprise, “Number One” is his first officer, and a young Lieutenant Spock is science officer.

As the story begins, the Enterprise crew is being cut down by a virulently contagious Rigelian fever.  The only known cure within range of the ship can be found on the independent world Cypria, near the Klingon border.  En route, the Enterprise responds to a distress call of a small Cyprian ship being attacked by Klingons.  Pike intervenes and rescues the ship’s two passengers: a Cyprian woman named Soleste and an angry Klingon woman, Merata, who angrily claims to have been abducted by the Cyprian.  Soleste claims that the Klingon is no Klingon at all, but actually her sister Elzura, who was kidnapped by Klingons when she was just a girl, following a violent raid on a Cyprian outpost.  Starfleet science quickly confirms this.  Soleste has been searching for her sister for a decade, and is desperate to bring her back home.  But Merata/Elzura has been raised as a Klingon and now sees herself as Klingon.  Captain Pike and the crew of the Enterprise quickly find themsleves caught between the Cyprians, who refuse to share their cure for Rigellian fever unless Elzura is returned to them, and Merata’s adopted Klingon father, who stands poised to attack and shatter the tenuous peace between the Federation and the Klingon Empire if his daughter is not returned to him.

Between the book’s title (which references a line spoken by Sarek to young Spock in 2009’s Star Trek reboot film: “you will always be a child of two worlds”) and the cover (which features a close-up on a “The Cage”-era Spock), I’d assumed that this novel would be a deep dive character study of young Spock.  (In much the same way that Margarent Wander Bonanno’s novel Burning Dreams, which had a similar-looking cover, focused on Captain Pike.)

That’s not the case.  While Child of Two Worlds does have a fantastic story-line for Spock, who sees in Merata/Elzura similarities to the way he himself is torn between his Vulcan and Human sides, the book gives wonderful attention to all of the major Pike-era characters, including Captain Pike himself, Number One, Doctor Boyce, Yeoman Colt, etc.  … [continued]

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Josh Reviews The Deuce: Season Three

You didn’t watch The Deuce?  Even though it was the latest show masterminded by David Simon, who created The Wire?  Look, I get it.  A TV show about the porn business in New York City in the seventies and eighties was a tough sell for many people.  I wasn’t even sure, at first, if I was going to watch it.  But I am so, so glad that I did.  I cannot recommend this show highly enough.  (Just make sure your kids and your parents are in another room, because there is a lot of, um, frank content on this show!!)  (Click here for my review of season one, and here for my review of season two.)

This latest series from David Simon (the mastermind behind The Wire), co-created with George Pelecanos (who wrote many episodes of The Wire and Treme — another of Mr. Simon’s shows that I dearly love and strongly recommend to any and all fans of good TV) was a brilliant, gripping, heartbreaking experience.  This was an exploration of another broken great American city; just as The Wire dissected Baltimore across multiple levels (from the drug-dealers on the corners, to their drug-lord bosses, to the cops on the street, to the detectives in their offices, to the people in city hall, and lots more), so too did The Deuce explore the people involved in the sex trade in the area that would become Time’s Square across all social strata: the prostitutes on the street and the pimps behind them, the street-cops making busts, the politicians looking to clean up the streets so big business interests could move in, the pornographers shooting dirty movies, the people working behind the counter in the local greasy spoon cafes and the bars, the mob men behind those bars, and on and on.

The Deuce was an epic saga at the same time as it was an intimate character drama.  As always, Mr. Simon and his team were able to create an enormously vast ensemble of characters, each of whom were astonishingly well-fleshed out, with their own human stories that developed across these three seasons.  As I felt in The Wire, and again in Treme, I deeply, dearly loved every single one of these characters, and I rooted so hard for each of them to find their way to some happiness.  Some of them did, and many of them didn’t.  But that only gave the show its power and emotional heft.

What a cast this show had.  Let’s start with James Franco, who was as brilliant as he has ever been, playing the dual role of twin brothers Frankie and Vincent Martino.  Seriously, this was an extraordinary performance.  I’ve been … [continued]

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Josh Reviews 1917

March 2nd, 2020
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Sam Mendes’ riveting war film, 1917, takes place over approximately twenty four hours in April, 1917.  The British have discovered that a German retreat isn’t what it looks like but is in fact a trap being set for a large contingent of British soldiers.  With telephone lines cut and no other way to warn the 1600 British troops (the Second Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment) who are about to walk into this trap, two young British soldiers are sent on a desperate mission to cross no-man’s land and tell the Second Battalion to call off their attack before they are annihilated.

Sam Mendes is an incredibly talented director.  I became an instant fan when I saw American Beauty in 1999, and I have enjoyed all of his subsequent films (with the exception of the most recent James Bond film, Spectre, which I thought was a huge letdown).  But, generally, I think Mr. Mendes has an extraordinary eye, and he can be counted on to create beautiful, deeply moving films.  1917 is no exception.

The film is shot to feel as if there is not a single edit made; the entire movie feels like one continuous, uninterrupted shot.  This is an extraordinary achievement, and I was continually impressed by the skill of Mr. Mendes, cinematographer Roger Deakins, and their entire team.  This is an extremely cool device; the result is that 1917 is an impressively immersive experience.  It’s a movie best seen on the largest screen possible.  We the audience feel as if we are right there with the two young men, Will and Tom, as they undertake their incredible journey.  The camera glides gracefully through the terrain, staying with the characters, and it’s as if we the audience are right there with them.  I can’t begin to imagine the complexities of staging and performing these lengthy, unbroken sequences.  The movie would have been great without the use of this technique; but it elevates 1917 into something truly special.

George MacKay plays Will Schofield and Dean-Charles Chapman plays Tom Blake, the two men sent on this perilous journey.  Mr. Mendes made the right choice when he chose these two relatively unknown actors to play these roles.  This allows both men to be a type of audience-surrogate “every-man” character into whom the audience can invest.  But both men have strong resumes, and they bring great skill to these performances.  Dean-Charles Chapman played Tommen Baratheon on Game of Thrones (in seasons 4-6), but he’s grown up and I didn’t recognize him at all.  His wide-eyed, boyish face brings an endearing innocence to Tom.  George MacKay’s Will, on the other hand, looks like a young man who has already seen terrible horrors in … [continued]