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Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019)

Josh Reviews Godzilla: King of the Monsters

July 10th, 2019

Godzilla: King of the Monsters is pretty much exactly what I’d expected it would be: fun but dumb.

The film is a sequel to Gareth Edwards’ 2014 Godzilla.  I enjoyed that film, though I didn’t love it the way many others did at the time.  I thought it was a very well-made film and I respected its ambition, but I didn’t connect with any of the sprawling cast of characters as deeply as I’d thought I should have.  The result was a film that felt rather superficial to me.

Godzilla: King of the Monsters, directed by Michael Dougherty, unfortunately moves further in that direction.  They’ve assembled a terrific cast, but we didn’t get nearly deeply enough into any one character’s story to suit me.  And so, while I thought the film was fun, I didn’t care about any of these characters.  I think for these sorts of monster movies to succeed, you have to care about the characters who you are following through these crazy situations.  But here, I really didn’t, and so I didn’t engage with the film in any sort of deep way.

There’s an interesting germ of an idea in the story of the main dysfunctional family.  Kyle Chandler plays Dr. Mark Russell and Vera Farmiga plays Dr. Emma Russell, while Stranger Things’ Millie Bobby Brown plays their daughter, Madison.  Their family was torn apart when Madison’s brother was killed in one of the Godzilla battles from the first film.  Mark descended into alcoholism and he and Emma split up.  Emma dove into her work, trying to find a way to communicate with (and perhaps control) the “Titans” (Godzilla and the other giant monsters — what the 2014 Godzilla film referred to as MUTOs).  When she and Madison are kidnapped by terrorists seeking to use Emma’s tech for their own nefarious purposes, Mark is drawn back into Monarch (the organization we’ve seen in Godzilla and also Kong: Skull Island, whose mission is to document and deal with these giant creatures) in an attempt to rescue them.  But Madison soon discovers that her mother has been drawn into very dark places, and she realizes that what she thought she knew about her estranged parents might have been very wrong.

That’s an interesting story around which to hang a crazy monster adventure.  But the problem is that we don’t spend nearly enough time actually getting to know and care about any of these characters.  From the trailers, I’d thought Millie Bobby Brown’s Madison would be a very important character.  I would have loved a version of this film that was told through her eyes, with our following the story through her experiences.  But Madison is a very … [continued]