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The Shape of Water (2017)

Josh Reviews The Shape of Water

Guillermo del Toro’s latest masterpiece, The Shape of Water, is set in the early sixties.  Sally Hawkins plays Elisa, a mute woman who works as a janitor at a government installation.  Her routine, lonely life is shaken when she discovers that the scientists and military officers at the base have captured a monster: a humanoid amphibian creature whose ability to survive the pressures of the deep they believe holds the key to the U.S.’s successfully mastering the hostile conditions of outer space.  Elisa gradually develops a connection with the monster, and when she fears that the military is going to kill him, she hatches a plan with her friends, fellow janitor Zelda (Octavia Spencer) and her neighbor artist Giles (Richard Jenkins), to attempt to free him.

I adore the films of Guillermo del Toro, and The Shape of Water is a return to the near-perfection of Mr. del Toro’s best Spanish-language works such as Pan’s Labyrinth (El Laberinto del Fauno) and The Devil’s Backbone.  Once again, Mr. del Toro has crafted a gorgeous fantasy film that is grounded in real-life settings with fully-realized, rich characters, and with a fantastically memorable new monster creature.  

The Shape of Water belongs to Sally Hawkins, who is magnificent as the mute, lonely Elisa.  Mr. del Toro and co-screenwriter Vanessa Taylor have created a beautifully drawn character, and Ms. Hawkins knocks the role out of the park with her deeply emotional, affecting performance.  And all without speaking a single word!  Without any dialogue or “internal monologue” narration, Ms. Hawkins and Mr. del Toro are nevertheless successful in creating a film that is focused on Elisa’s inner life.  It is her emotions, and her actions, that drive the film.  This is a very clever approach, and yet one that could have been fiendishly difficult to achieve.  Yet Ms. Hawkins’ phenomenal work makes this all sing.  This is an incredible performance, and it is worth seeing this film just to watch what Ms. Hawkins is able to achieve.

Mr. del Toro’s films always show an enormous affection for the fantasy/monster creatures.  Each of his films contain wonderfully detailed, well-thought-out and beautifully-realized new monster/creatures, and the amphibious creature in The Shape of Water is a wonderful addition to Mr. del Toro’s filmography.  Mr. del Toro’s frequent collaborator, Doug Jones, does an extraordinary job in bringing this creature to life.  Although the creature, like Elisa, does not speak a word in the film, the gorgeous makeup/prosthetics design, combined with Mr. Jones’ incredible performance, communicate exactly what this creature is thinking and feeling.  I have seen many talented actors whose performance was lost under elaborate prosthetics or makeup, but Mr. Jones is a master at this sort of … [continued]