\

Browse Josh's Portfolio and the Comic, Reviews or Blog archive.

Josh’s Favorite TV Series of 2019 — Part Four!

All right!  We’ve entered the TOP TEN of my list of my favorite TV series of 2019!  Click here for numbers twenty-five through twenty-one, click here for numbers twenty through sixteen, and click here for numbers fifteen through eleven.

10. Legion The best super-hero show that no one I know was watching.  Created by Noah Hawley (Fargo), Legion was a gloriously weird, outlandish, surprising series that eschewed all the tropes of a standard super-hero TV show.  Every time I thought I might know where the show was going, I’d be surprised to, instead, get a dance number!  Or a bizarre digression into, say, watching a Japanese-language explanation of the rules of time-travel!  This show was an incredible visual feast, filled with extraordinarily unusual and memorable sequences.  This third and final season took a deep dive into the X-Men mythology, exploring the events in which a young Charles Xavier fell in love with an Israeli woman, Gabrielle Haller, and confronted the powerful psychic villainy of Amahl Farouk, the Shadow King.  This was thrilling to see on-screen.  At the same time, the show moved even further away from the type of standard super-hero narrative that one might expect, choosing instead to get weirder and wilder.  There was never anything on TV quite like this show.  I miss it already.  (Click here for my full review of season three.)

9. Better Things Pamela Adlon’s gloriously strange, personal, funny, moving show is one of the most unique and wonderful series currently being produced.  It is phenomenal expression of Ms. Adlon’s enormous talent: she wrote almost every episode (eight of the season’s twelve episodes), and she directed ALL of them.  This show focuses on an incredible array of strong and interesting women: single mother Sam Fox (played by Ms. Adlon), her mother Phil, and her three children Max, Frankie, and Duke… and also the many other interesting women in Sam’s life!  Ms. Adlon’s storytelling is hyper-focused on honesty, specifically when it comes to depicting the real-life joys and struggles and sorrows of life as a working single parent of kids.  She seems to revel in showing the audience real-life moments we’ve never seen on TV before.  (As a prime example: episode seven, “Toilet,” chronicles Sam’s preparations for her colonoscopy.)  Season three was the first season created without the involvement of Louis C.K., but the show didn’t miss a beat and, if anything, was even better in that it became more personal than ever for Ms. Adlon, completely infused with her life and her experiences and her perspective.  If you’ve never seen this show, you should remedy that immediately.  (Click here for my full review of season three.)… [continued]