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Josh Reviews His Dark Materials Season One

Philip Pullman’s fantasy trilogy His Dark Materials was originally published between 1995-2000.  The first book, The Golden Compass, had previously been adapted into a mediocre movie back in 2007.  Now, the BBC and HBO have adapted that first book, The Golden Compass, into an eight-episode TV series.  I recently read the His Dark Materials novels for the first time and was interested to see HBO’s adaptation.  I enjoyed it!

I must confess, first off, that while I enjoyed reading the His Dark Materials novels, I wouldn’t consider myself a huge fan.  There was a lot that I liked about the books.  I loved the complexity of the world-building.  I enjoyed the strongly-formed characters.  I appreciated that Mr. Pullman had a lot to critique about organized religion, though I do not nearly share what seems like his deep dislike/mistrust of all religion.  Additionally, I sometimes felt those criticisms of religion, and what felt like an atheistic worldview, got in the way of the story for me.  I also sometimes felt the books were a bit too complicated for their own good, with characters coming and going at rapid speed, whereas I would have enjoyed spending more time with them and getting to know them better.  But I loved what an original and unique series this was, and I was surprised how adult in tone it was.  I was certainly excited to see what this might look like translated on screen.

HBO has clearly spared no expense with their production of His Dark Materials.  (I’d imagine that HBO is quite eager to find their next Game of Thrones…)  This series looks incredible.  There are a huge number of different locations in the series, and each one is beautifully realized.  I never felt claustrophobic or that I was watching actors on cheap sets.  No, this world felt huge and immersive.  This is the epic canvas this story deserves.  There’s all sorts of epic action — fighting armored bears, flying zombie-things called Cliff Ghasts, witches, and more — and it all looks great.  (The character animation on the bears, in particular, is magnificent.)

And then there are the daemons.  One of the hardest aspects of bringing this story to life on screen must surely have been the daemons that every character in Lyra’s world possesses; an animal bonded to each human being.  These talking animals, each with a distinct personality of their own, could only be brought to life through top-notch (and surely expensive) visual effects.  I cannot begin to imagine how difficult it was to create and realize all of the many different daemons seen throughout this first season.  I’d suspected the show would try to find ways to avoid showing … [continued]